Johan Fourie's blog

I'd rather be a comma than a fullstop

Writing a biography of an uncharted people

with 2 comments

Biography

Two weeks ago, early on the Tuesday morning while still in bed, I opened my laptop to start the day. I was staying in a guest house in Guelph, Canada, where I was on a short visit before heading off to the Economic History Association meetings in San José at the end of that week. Scanning through my mails, my eyes came to rest on an address I had expected – an email from our Development and Alumni Relations officer. It read only: ‘Geluk Johan!’ – ‘Congratulations Johan!’ Our Mellon application was successful. The Biography of an Uncharted People project had begun.

The idea for the Mellon project had started roughly a year earlier. South Africa’s individual-level census data for much of the period before 1948 has not been preserved, and economic history is increasingly moving towards understanding ‘history from below’, using large datasets to investigate the social, demographic and economic aspects of human behaviour in the past. Fortunately, large numbers of other types of individual-level records have been preserved in South Africa’s archives, and are increasingly being digitised by institutions such as FamilySearch.org. These records include things like marriage records, death notices, voters’ rolls, tax censuses and slave emancipation records. Using such source material, I believe, would have two main benefits: firstly, it would open many new avenues for historical inquiry and, secondly, it would help equip history students with the skills of the data revolution, something I’ve written about before.

Dyanti Ngcita

An example of a Cape province death certificate

But transcription is expensive. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, however, is a generous supporter of research in the humanities, and after a rigorous internal and external application process, with many excellent competing project bids, we received, on that wonderful Tuesday morning, the happy news of success – starting in January 2018, the project will be funded for five years.

This will not only be a South African project. We have brought together an impressive team of scholars, with a wide range of expertise. Now we are scouting for academically dedicated and enthusiastic students to join us in writing this new biography. We offer bursaries from postdoc to Honours level. More information is available on the project website.

I am excited about what the newly transcribed information, currently hidden away in millions of unused documents, can reveal. I am excited about building a team of dedicated and brilliant young scholars, a team that can continue long after the five years funding term. And I am also excited to join a new faculty and department, encouraging inter-disciplinary research that will, hopefully, provide new insights into the lives of South Africans, present and past.

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2 Responses

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  1. Excellent! eggsa.org is an excellent site to join hands with. They are particularly focused on gravestones if you can use that. And also help them. The problem with a site like familysearch.org is that individuals with no prior research information can upload information without the necessary documents. This can lead to bogus people or identities and sometime the same people have three or more different profiles created by different people (sometime with slight variations in the spelling of surnames – I am a Burger and some of the earlier Burgers were also called Burcherdt and with variations as well). Another site I found useful is naairs. The archives are of good quality and I have found a lot of useful information here. Isabel Groesbeek is a specialist in the filed of genealogy and she may also be of help in connecting you with other people.
    Good luck with the project. I hope it is successful.

    Kind regards,
    Schalk Burger.

    Schalk Burger

    October 2, 2017 at 06:57

  2. Congratulations Johan, and best wishes in your venture.

    Poly

    September 30, 2017 at 03:25


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